Poster

Category:
Behavioral Health, Mental Health, Substance Abuse
Year:
2016
Title:
A COMPARISON OF PUFF BEHAVIORS DURING CIGARETTE AND LITTLE CIGAR USE
Presenter:
(School of Public Health (UMD) Behavioral and Community Health Faculty)
Authors:
Das, Babita (UMD SPH Behavioral and Community Health), Cruz-Cano, Raul (UMD SPH Epidemiology and Biostatistics), Clark, Pamela (UMD SPH Behavioral and Community Health)
Abstract:
Federal regulation of cigarettes (flavors, package size, taxation) does not currently apply to cigar products. Despite a recent tripling in U.S. little cigar sales, little is known about the behaviors involved in little cigar use. It is unclear whether distinct smoking patterns during little cigar and cigarette use lead to varying amounts of tobacco smoke exposure. Puff topography can serve as a measure of mainstream smoke exposure during combustible tobacco use. This study compared puff behaviors during cigarette and little cigar use to identify potential differences in amount of smoke exposure. In a two-day open-label crossover trial, 18 daily cigarette smokers used one Cheyenne brand little cigar and one Newport brand cigarette on separate days in a laboratory setting. The order of product exposure was randomized, and participants smoked products that matched their preferred cigarette flavor (menthol/non-menthol). Using a SPA-D (Sodim) smoking topography device, time spent smoking, number of puffs, puff volumes, puff durations, and interpuff intervals were recorded during both smoking sessions. A General Linear Mixed Model approach with gamma distributions to account for skewed distributions in the outcome variables revealed a significantly greater mean puff volume during cigarette use compared to little cigar use (p<.0001), and a shorter mean interpuff interval during cigarette use compared to little cigar use (p=0.0197). No significant differences were found between mean puff duration during cigarette and little cigar use (p=0.3488). Paired t-tests revealed significantly more time spent smoking little cigars (p=0.0048) and more puffs taken while smoking little cigars (p=.0620). Results show variability in puff behaviors during cigarette and little cigar use. More research is needed to explore how puff behaviors differ between single-product cigarette and cigar users and dual users. Real world measures of topography such as ecological momentary assessment may help answer questions about how cigarette and cigar use differ in frequency of use, characteristics of a smoking session, and how these factors might contribute to differences in smoke exposure.